How Did Egypt Influence Ancient Civilization

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Mankind has seen the rise and fall of many prominent civilizations throughout human history, but the most influential civilization to all of human history were the Ancient Egyptians. The civilization of Ancient Egypt thrived throughout the Nile River from 3300 BC to around 300 B.C. when Alexander the Great conquered it. Throughout these 3000 years, the Ancient Egyptians contributed various inventions and knowledge that is still used today. Ancient Egyptians contributed mathematics, astronomy, medicine, astronomy, and the invention of various inventions that are seen in our everyday lives. These inventions include glass, paper, ink, clocks, and even calenders; these inventions would, of course, be innovated as time went on to the ones that we…show more content…
Althought papyrus was mainly used for papers, the Ancient Egyptians found other uses for the plant as well, for example, they used papyrus to make mats, baskets, boats, and even used it as food. The Papyrus plant had many functions in the ancient world of Egypt, but it was most commonly used as paper for communication and to record knowledge and history. The papyrus continued to be in use for almost 4,000 years until the chinese replaced it with the paper we know today. By the 7th century, the use for papyrus was steadily declining throughout Egypt and the Mediterranean, as paper became widely used throughout the lands. Of course, in order to use paper we must learn how to write which is another innovation of the Ancient Egyptians. Written language can be traced back to 8,000 B.C. from the Ancient Sumerians, but of course before written language can be introduced to other places outside of Sumer, the Ancient Egyptians were using a form of written language, that is commonly attributed to them, Hieroglyphics. Growing up, everyone learned that hieroglyphics was the writing known in Ancient Egypt, but most don’t learn that it wasn’t the only one, in fact, hieroglyphics was the first form of written
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